Orthodox Christian Catechism in the Aleut language of Alaska (Eastern dialect of the Fox Islands) – Saint Innocent (Veniaminov) of Alaska (+1879) & Ivan Pan’kov

http://www.asna.ca/alaska/aleut/first-catechism.pdf

Orthodox Christian Catechism

in the Aleut language (Eastern dialect of the Fox Islands)

by

Saint Innocent (Veniaminov) of Alaska (+1879)

& Ivan Pan’kov – manuscript 1826 (0.2 MB)

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Aleut (Unangan) Orthodox Language Texts

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To deny oneself means – Saint Innocent of Alaska (+1879)

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FAITHBOOK – ORTHODOXY

To deny oneself means

Saint Innocent of Alaska (+1879)

Saint Innocent of Alaska:

“To deny oneself means to give up one’s bad habits; to root out of the heart all that ties us to the world; not to cherish bad thoughts or desires; to suppress every evil thought; not to desire to do anything out of self love, but to do everything out of love for God”.

Source:

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ORTHODOX CHURCH QUOTES

The Shaman and the Saint

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NATIVE AMERICANS MET ORTHODOXY

The Shaman and the Saint

St. Innocent, Equal to the Apostles had an illustrious career – he began as a simple missionary priest to the Aleut people of Alaska, and wound up as Metropolitan of Moscow. But even though he was an important and influential man, he was humble and unassuming, very aware of his failings and his temptations. Because of this, St. Innocent managed to miss meeting angels.

St. Innocent’s first parish was a series of islands spread over 1700 miles of the Bering Sea. He and his family settled on Unalaska Island, and he made a point of traveling by kayak and ship to as many islands and villages as he could during the year to attend to the needs of his parishioners.

In April of 1828, some people from Unimak Island arrived in Dutch Harbour. They had come to ask him if he would visit them. Unimak is about four hundred miles north east (as the crow flies) from Unalaska. He told the delegation that he’d be happy to come with them, but on the way, he wanted to stop at Akun Island, which lies halfway between Unalaska and Unimak.

We have to remember that in 1828, the telephone hadn’t been invented yet. Mail service was nonexistent, except when the company ships brought parcels and letters from Russia or Sitka, and in any case, the Aleut people, until St. Innocent arrived, hadn’t needed a written language, so they didn’t read or Continue reading “The Shaman and the Saint”